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Our conference theme spotlights someone who inspires colleagues and students every day. The current educational landscape calls for 21st Century learning with more rigorous Common Core Standards. This year’s conference offerings demonstrate how educators can meet these demands in ways that inspire students, colleagues and themselves. Each participant will meet over 3 days in one small-group session focused on a single topic in teaching reading and writing. This focused attention on one area of interest allows attendees to more deeply consider implementation of strategies discussed.
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Miles Myers, a founding director of the Bay Area Writing Project and fixture at Asilomar for over fifty years, exemplifies this year’s conference theme. Miles inspired teachers and students with his keen mind and compassionate heart while teaching English at Oakland High School in the 1960s and 1970s and at every Asilomar conference through 2015. We can still hear him laughing with joy.

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Speakers


BurkeJIM BURKE teaches English at Burlingame High School, a public school where he has worked for over twenty years. He is the author of more than twenty books, including The Common Core Companion: The Standards Decoded published by Heinemann. Jim has received several awards, including the 2000 NCTE Exemplary English Leadership Award. He created the English Companion Ning, an online community for English teachers, which has been awarded the Best Social Network for Teachers several times. Jim’s keynote will share examples from his own classroom to demonstrate how we as educators can inspire our students and new colleagues.

ReynoldsDAN REYNOLDS is a classroom teacher, community volunteer, and union activist. He focuses his efforts on empowering student voices; promoting the teaching profession to youth; pushing for culturally responsive and social justice oriented school-, district-, and state-level policies; and developing curriculum, including an elective course in Human Rights Education. He has received numerous honors, including a CTA Human Rights Award, and the NCTE High School Teacher of Excellence Award. Dan is the chair of the Mt. Diablo Peace & Justice Center, chair of the Contra Costa Central Labor Council education committee, and chair of the Curriculum Study Commission.

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Study Sessions

 

GRADES 2-8       COMMON CORE EMPHASIS       TEACHING MATERIAL PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      GENERAL ENRICHMENT

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Utilizing mentor texts, participants will learn how to teach students two things 1) to demonstrate a writing skill found in the text that students can emulate in their own writing; 2) to inspire students to write something similar, while annexing their own words and finding their own writer’s voice. A variety of strategies and resources will be shared.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
All teachers love to talk about their favorite read alouds so the discussion will start there, with sharing favorite read alouds and why those books are chosen. Much of what is taught in Lucy Calkins’ workshops will be implemented in this session including apprenticing sentences and mini-lessons. Once the strategy of apprenticing sentences and using partner sentencing is shared, participants will learn to apply these strategies to their own favorite read-aloud. We will work in partners and small groups with round table discussions so the “talk-time” and learning opportunities from one another will be increased. One example of Writer’s Workshop (a sixth grade example) can be viewed at: http://www.heinemann.com/shared/marketingcontent/calkins-samplers/calkinssamp_gr6.pdf

Each participant will also create their own Life Map, which will be a stepping stone to other ways to inspire writers, even themselves. Once pieces of writing are generated, if we have time, we will also experience “spoken-word poetry,” another way to lift writing in students. Exchanging ideas of how to inspire writing, particularly in reluctant writers, will be emphasized (Lingo Lounge, spoken-word poetry, creative writes, etc.)

Cheri Eplin is a fifth grade teacher and published children’s book author. She has also taught third grade and K-5 Science in addition to being a K-7 school principal and elementary assistant principal. As a writer and teacher, Cheri pushes her students to high standards while still developing a love of reading and writing. She led this session at Asilomar 64 and received top reviews from participants.

GRADES 9-COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIAL PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      COMMON CORE EMPHASIS      GENERAL ENRICHMENT

SESSION DESCRIPTION
CCSS do not ask students to discover themselves. They do invite educators to open a door to the principles of deepened learning we explore in this session. Sustained reflection, pervasive questioning, and active cultivation of wisdom through particular classroom practices guide students not only to find what they think – but what they VALUE.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Early in his 25 years of teaching sophomores at American High School in Fremont, CA, John began developing the Personal Creed Project. His impulse was to help his students carve out time alongside their academic learning to discover what they valued in life. Under continuous development for 25 years, the Personal Creed Project is used in schools and colleges around the country. To explain why students across the achievement gap are consistently more engaged during Creed season in his classes than at any other time during the year, John posits a model of deepened learning, which now informs all his work in the classroom and beyond. John believes this model presents the first professional understanding of depth in learning. To implement the model, John designs his courses using a two-legged approach, enabling him to integrate both planning for his students’ academic development and facilitation of their personal growth. In planning his units and lessons he employs three course-deepening design principles: sustained reflection, pervasive questioning, and active cultivation of wisdom.

John Cregar is an accomplished teacher, presenter and author with numerous awards including the prestigious James Moffett Memorial Award for Teacher Research from the National Council of Teachers of English and the National Writing Project. His articles have appeared in California English, Urantia Fellowship Herald, and one is forthcoming in NCTE’s Journal of the Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning. His first book is The Personal Creed Project and a New Vision of Learning. (Heineman, 2004). He is currently envisioning a second book with the working title The Case for Depth, and contemplating a third about his evolving sophomore course.

Recent Comments from Teacher Participants in John’s professional development sessions praised his work:
Asilomar Language Arts Conference, October 2014:
“I actually experienced something great. A validation of my personal teaching mantra of embracing the personal/human side of education and a project that, in its completeness, can be easily instigated in the classroom.”
“I valued every part of this session. I had my own personal experience doing a mini version of the Creed Project. It opened my eyes and I feel wiser because of it!”

PRE-CONFERENCE READING REQUIRED:
James Moffett, Confessions of an Ex-College Freshman.

ENCOURAGED:
The Universal Schoolhouse: Spiritual Awakening Through Education by James Moffett
What’s the Big Idea? By Jim Burke
The Personal Creed Project and a New Vision of Learning by John Creger

 

GRADE 4-COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIAL PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
We will explore ways to craft assessments using various technological platforms. The Google Drive suite and a plethora of free apps gives teachers powerful tools to deepen students’ learning and create classrooms that are fun and creative. We will develop CCSS aligned assessments and lessons to enhance learning and differentiate instruction.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
As our society becomes increasingly tech dependent (and our administrations and school boards follow suit) it is imperative that we know how to assess – and by extension, to teach–to prepare our students for this new environment. In this study session, we will explore ways to craft and deliver summative and formative assessments using various technological platforms. The Google Drive suite and a plethora of free apps and websites gives teachers incredibly powerful tools to deepen our students’ learning and create classrooms that are simply more fun and creative–for the students and for us. This is not simply an apps presentation, where a presenter delivers a plethora of unrelated apps. We will develop CCSS aligned assessments and the lessons that accompany them to enhance learning, students’ access to the curriculum, and differentiate our own practice.

PRE-CONFERENCE READING
Please familiarize yourself with Google tools. You do not have to be an expert by any means, but it will be helpful to have a basic idea of what they do. You can follow this link to learn more. https://edutrainingcenter.withgoogle.com/fundamentals/preview

GRADES 2 – 6      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS
DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS      COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
“Read. Read. Read, everything!” William Faulkner uttered this decades ago, and his words still ring true. If we want to write, we need to be readers, and vice versa. It is through both reading and writing “up close,” however, that we begin to understand how to do both well. Come, to venture in.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
During this workshop, participants will share ways they do “close reading” in several nonfiction genre. Text features have great impact on both reading and writing nonfiction, so they will be explored in a Question-the-Author format (Beck, et. al, 1997): Why this subheading? Why these bullets? Why this font, this amount of white space, this diagram or picture or label or chart?

Texts will be explored, too, with regard to their structure, development (elaboration and craft), and language conventions. With key features of text in mind, participants will engage in close writing opportunities that involve the writing process and publication (from newsletters to wikis, blogs, and websites). Participants will be allotted time to work on their own classroom materials.

Resources worth purchasing before hand, or at the Asilomar bookstore:
Close Reading in Elementary School: Bringing Readers and Texts Together, by Diana Sisson and Betsy Sisson (Routledge, 2014).
Note: This book not only has frameworks for “close reading” across the genre, but “close talks” and “close writes,” as well.

Resources participants can access online:
“Close Reading in Elementary Classrooms,” by Dr. Douglas Fisher (McGraw Hill) http://mhreadingwonders.com/wp-content/themes/readingwonders/docs/9430_Fisher_Author_9-4.pdf

“Close Reading in Elementary Schools,” by Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey (The Reading Teacher, Vol. 66, #3, pp 179-188. DOI:10.1002/TRTR.01117)

“Writing to Read: A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Writing and Writing Instruction on Reading,” by Steve Graham and Michael Hebert, Harvard Educational Review, Vol 81, #4, pp. 710-744. Winter 2011. (For you grant-writers out there!)

PRE-CONFERENCE READING
If possible, please read the article about close reading by Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey, “Close Reading in Elementary Schools,” The Reading Teacher, Volume 66 #3, pp. 179-188. Available at http://www.americanreading.com/documents/close-reading-in-elementary-schools.pdf

 

GRADES 6-COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS
COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Blogs, zines, pamphlets, anthologies, online journals, Youtube videos, Twitter flash fiction, more! Free yourself from the essay pile with the incorporation of authentic publishing opportunities while also empowering the students to authentically work as writers, editors, and publishers. In this session, you will learn how by doing this yourself!

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Blogs, zines, pamphlets, anthologies, online journals, Youtube videos, Twitter flash fiction, more! Free yourself from the essay pile with the incorporation of authentic publishing opportunities while also empowering the students to authentically work as writers, editors, and publishers. In this session, you will learn how by doing this yourself!

To this session, you should bring a sample of writing of at least 5 pages. This can be a collection of short stories, essays, poems that you have collected over the years. You could also (additionally or in replacement) bring a collection of 30 images that you have created, whether photographs or photos of paintings/sculptures/quilts/other visual art.

We will talk about authentic assessments of writing and the Common Core; read and identify key characteristics of publishing forms (like blogs, zines, anthologies); identify a form in which to work and the purpose for the work; create a sample and a rubric to assess it; and also learn about resources for publishing in more traditional forms.

PRE-CONFERENCE READING
Short readings will be provided to participants in August.

 

GRADES 9-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      ENGLISH LEARNERS      COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
The collaborative collage project offers students the chance to collaborate in order to develop a firmer understanding of purpose, audience, and rhetorical conventions (CCSS.ELA.W4&5). Developed, in part, at UNC Charlotte, the group technique puts students into a problem-solving situation paralleling the writing process. Participants engage fully.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Linda Flowers suggests that a “making thinking visible” project helps writers see themselves as thinkers in a social and rhetorical context. Collaborative planning becomes a platform for such “seeing,” which grows out of a rich tradition of social and cognitive research.

In this Collaborative Collage project, we will unpack the learning opportunities when the composers are put into a seemingly simple situation of creating a visual representation of a topic of their choice. Students at all levels of language proficiency and learning styles can engage fully in this activity. In collaborative negotiation, students choose an abstract concept (such as peace, beauty, teamwork) or a problem (bullying, the future, depression, addiction, gender identity). They search through print material for images and words, being open to all possibilities. They re-search through their gathered material and begin selecting pieces to make connections, discussing the possible connections and how their ideas of the concept are taking shape. The group negotiates and decides on an overall structure for the collage and begins to assemble the parts by talking through choices and directions and revisions to initial ideas. Together, they can see how the composing process shifts and moves forward when framed by purpose and audience.

Flowers calls this “constructive planning.” Writers are almost forced to read the situation and create their own complex web of intentions. Groups must consider alternatives and deal with conflicts as they develop a network of subgoals, plans, and criteria. The plan and the “visual text” develop in a kind of dialectic where “each shapes the other,” as Flowers would say.

After completing the collage, students write an extended reflection on their activity. What happened? Students write the narrative of their activity, including character, setting, time, motivation, tension, and details of dialogue and action. So What? Students evaluate the situation and the collage, addressing not only the product, but the process as well. What next? Looking at the composing process, what best practices will they carry forward into other composing situations?

The collage itself can also be analyzed and interpreted for what it is claiming, how it is culturally informed, and what visual cues help to carry the meaning.

Common Core Standards addressed in this project: Text Types and Purposes: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2, CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3. Production and Distribution of Writing: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4 Range of Writing: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.10

GRADES K-8      INTERVENTION/COACHING/SPECIALISTS      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS      COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Do your beliefs about teaching writing keep you up at night? Have you shoved that bad student writing in the closet, dreading someone reading those EL pieces? This therapeutic session promises relief. Try out a new medication that replaces prescriptive EL instruction. Wake up Monday to clean that closet!

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Lorena Lopez is a District English Learner Instructional Coach for San Jose USD. As a bilingual teacher she has taught emergent and proficient English Learners at the elementary level.

Laura Brown is an intervention teacher at Valle Vista ES, Mount Pleasant ESD, who is a veteran who has taught K-12. She also works with Lorena on the leadership team for the San Jose Area Writing Project. They write and deliver professional development in the teaching of writing for schools and districts.

Their website is a blog: https://inspiringteacherstowrite.com

GRADES K-COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      COMMON CORE EMPHASIS       GENERAL ENRICHMENT

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Direct observation of nature can serve as the hub for cross-curricular connections between ELA and STEM. Using Asilomar as Nature Lab, participants will learn how to adapt the scientist’s field notebook as a tool for observation (visual, written, and personal) to promote creativity, rigorous inquiry, and invention in students’ writing practice.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
“Creativity is not a talent. It’s a way of operating.” ~ John Cleese

Direct observation of nature can serve as the hub for numerous cross-curricular connections between the ELA, science, history, art, ethnic studies, and math. And, recent studies have underscored the positive impacts on health and well being that spending time outside confers on children. From pigeons in the parking lot to beautiful on-campus gardens, all schools provide an opportunity for students to interact with the natural world on some level. Making use of Asilomar as Nature Lab, participants will learn strategies for leaving the physical classroom and digital screens behind to engage their students in nature-based activities that can serve as the starting point for language arts learning and more.

Participants will learn how to adapt the scientist’s field notebook as a tool for observation (visual, written, and personal) to promote creativity, rigorous inquiry, and invention in students’ writing practice. Participants will learn how to take advantage of their schools’ outdoor spaces to foster interconnected and focused thinking. Through a combination of time in the field, guided instruction, discussions, and real world examples, participants will better understand how direct observation of nature can serve as a starting point for diverse curricula in the language arts, STEM, and beyond.

PRE-CONFERENCE READING
Optional: Smith, K. (2008). How to be an explorer of the world: Portable life museum. New York: Perigee.

GRADES 4-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Writing meaningfully about stories is the heart of our teaching. Yet more often than we’d like to admit, the end result of our bridge between reading and writing – the literary essay – falls short of the powerful writing it could be. In this session we’ll explore ways to improve the essay by writing one of our own.

 

GRADES 6-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS        COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
We will explore the Inquiry Project as it supports College and Career Readiness. This is a highly adaptable yearlong SSR curriculum that focuses on student-directed learning and Common Core-aligned assessments. We’ll discuss the crucial components of inquiry-based learning and investigate ways to adapt this project into your own curriculum.

 

GRADES 6-COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION

SESSION DESCRIPTION
This session will provide instruction and practice for creating desktop videos to supplement lessons, give direction to classes during your absence, and to archive instruction to support absent students. Participants will also study and discuss the video essay as a lesson component. Moderate technological proficiency is recommended.

EQUIPMENT CHECKLIST
Participant should bring laptops and cellphone video cameras for this hands-on session.

 

GRADES 6-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS
DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS        COMMON CORE EMPHASIS        GENERAL ENRICHMENT

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Humanize the plight of refugees around the globe. Bring awareness and compassion to a difficult topic while leaving personal politics at the door. With a focus on the Common Core and community involvement, this relevant and timely cross-curricular PBL unit will transform your students and your campus.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Working in teams of four, this project helped to humanize rather than politicize the plight of and causes for refugees around the globe. Student teams are assigned different countries where refugee crises are occurring in addition to focusing on relief organizations that help. Our 7th grade students researched, wrote, actively fund raised and presented information to community members in a transformative project that incorporated a variety of academic and life skills. World History, ELA, Art, Home Economics, Digital Communications and variety of other teachers got involved to make this a truly cross-curricular experience for these students.

PRE-CONFERENCE READING
For more information on the process please read the blog at: http://townsendsclassblog.blogspot.com
This blog was used to stay in contact with parents about what were doing but also to chronicle the process. Weeks 13 through 16 are the entries for this 4-week unit.

GRADES 6-COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS        COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Tom Romano wrote that a multigenre paper is composed of many genres and subgenera, each piece self-contained, making a point of its own, yet connected to other pieces by theme and content. In this session, participants will read a sample multigenre paper, discuss mentor texts, and try writing in multiple genres themselves.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
In order to get the most out of the writing part of this session, participants must bring a favorite novel or text set as inspiration, or a small collection of resources for research on any topic of personal interest.

OPTIONAL PRE-CONFERENCE READING

To learn more about the multigenre writing task before coming to Asilomar, participants could consult articles or books about multigenre papers in the classroom. We suggest: Multigenre Research: The Power of Choice and Interpretation by Camille A. Allen and Laurie Swistak in Language Arts, January 2004

Fearless Writing: Multigenre to Motivate and Inspire by Tom Romano

A Teacher’s Guide to the Multigenre Research Project: Everything You Need to Get Started by Melinda Putz

The Multigenre Research Paper: Voice, Passion, and Discovery in Grades 4-6 by Camille A. Allen

The November 2002 issue of English Journal, which focused on multigenre writing.

GRADES 6-12      TEACHING MATERIAL PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
If we are to truly prepare our students for college-level thinking and writing, then we need to break away from rigid essay structures that strive to avoid complexity and find ways instead to embrace it. In this session we will explore ways the UC Subject-A style prompt can work as an effective tool for college readiness.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
The University of California Analytical Writing Placement Exam (known colloquially as “the Subject A” test, so named for the remedial class you must take if you fail), has bedeviled generations of incoming freshmen. Yet if you look carefully at the prompt, you will see that it asks students to engage in a reading, thinking, and writing exercise that reflects in important ways the moves they will need to succeed at the university. Drawing on the work of the California Writing Project’s Improving Student Analytical Writing initiative, this session will explore ways in which teachers create Subject A-style prompts across the curriculum to prepare their students for college level work.

PRE-CONFERENCE READING
Resource person will provide Chapter 1 of George Gadda’s out-of-print book Teaching Analytical Writing.

GRADES K-12      GENERAL ENRICHMENT      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Teachers of writing rarely have time to practice the craft of writing themselves. Participants select a local destination and are given time to write. Group members respond to one another’s drafts. Spend a weekend writing in the beautiful environment surrounding Asilomar and brushing up on how to get students to respond to one another’s writing.

GRADES K-COLLEGE      GENERAL ENRICHMENT      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS     TEACHING MATERIAL PROVIDED     ENGLISH LEARNERS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
For many, opera has always seemed esoteric, difficult to understand, and even fearsome. We’ll fix that. Let this section help you both to enjoy the emotional and intellectual rewards of operatic theater, and learn new things. You will hear familiar music, restore your soul, and come back with materials and ideas that can be useful in the classroom.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
This session will help both the beginner and the more knowledgeable to enjoy the emotional and intellectual rewards of operatic theater. Since operatic music is often heard in films, television, and sometimes even emerging in commercials and cartoons, the selections being presented will be familiar, enjoyable, and memorable.

GRADES 6-COLLEGE      GENERAL ENRICHMENT      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      ENGLISH LEARNERS

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Often obscured by “slopes of statistics” are those teachers who inspired us – often with poetry – to carry that inspiration to our students. Poetry is a vital way to unite our fires and theirs. Join us as we read, write, and share some flames to carry back to our classrooms.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Often obscured by mountains of tech info, test data, and what Gary Snyder called “slopes of statistics” are those teachers who inspired us – often with poetry – to become teachers and to carry that inspiration to our students. Poetry is a vital way to unite our fires and theirs. Based on such teacher-inspired poetry anthologies as Teaching with Fire: Poetry That Sustains the Courage to Teach, (edited by Sam M. Intrator and Megan Scribner) and time-tested approaches to poetry instruction, we’ll read, write, and share some flames to carry back to our classrooms. Please join us!

PRE-CONFERENCE READING
Please read poems you’ve always loved and/or been inspired by, and/or poems you’ve shared with your students. Immerse yourself in whatever those poems did to “spark” you and your students into a larger vision of the world(s) you inhabit.

We also recommend these books, which will be a part of our session for enrichment: Teaching with Fire: Poetry That Sustains the Courage to Teach (edited by Sam M. Intrator and Megan Scribner)

Leading From Within: Poetry That Sustains the Courage to Lead (edited by Sam M. Intrator and Megan Scribner)

Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within by Natalie Goldberg

The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises from Poets Who Teach (edited by Robin Behn and Chase Twichell)

GENERAL ENRICHMENT

SESSION DESCRIPTION
School or district teams can use the conference time to plan their own Common Core implementation. Groups often find inspiration from the keynote and Around the Hearth sessions. Discounts offered for groups of 5 or more.

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Conference Schedule


Friday, October 7
3:30 – 9:00 Registration
4:30 – 5:30 Reception
6:00 – 7:00 Dinner
7:15 – 8:30 GENERAL SESSION A in Chapel
8:45 – 9:45 GROUP SESSION #1

Saturday, October 8
7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast
8:00 – 5:45 Bookstore Open
9:00 – 10:30 GROUP SESSION #2
10:30 – 10:45 Coffee Break
10:45 – 12:00 GROUP SESSION #3
12:00 – 1:00 Lunch
1:15 – 2:30 GROUP SESSION #4
2:45 – 4:00 GENERAL SESSION B
4:00 – 5:45 Reception and Book Signing
6:00 – 7:00 Dinner
7:15 – 8:15 Around the Hearth Session I
8:30 – 9:30 Around the Hearth Session II

Sunday, October 9
7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast
8:00 – 9:00 Bookstore Open
9:15 – 10:45 GROUP SESSION #5
10:45 – 11:00 Coffee Break
11:00 – 12:00 GENERAL SESSION C

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Recent Conferences

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