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Excellence Through Equity: From a Powerful Vision to Everyday Reality marks what many believe to be a rising tide toward a deeply felt desire—the desire to provide a brighter future for all our country’s students. We convene to learn the ways in which school leaders and classroom teachers better educate all students.

 

 

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Speakers


NogueraPEDRO NOGUERA is a Distinguished Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education and Information Sciences at UCLA and author of Excellence Through Equity: Five Principles of Courageous Leadership to Guide Achievement for Every Student, Dr. Noguera’s broad, lasting public influence has lead to his being ranked as one of the top ten RHSU Edu-Scholars of Public Influence.

 

JagoCAROL JAGO is the editor of California English, past president of NCTE, and associate director of the California Reading and Literature Project at UCLA, has served as AP Literature content advisor for the College Board and has published several books for teachers, including four books on contemporary multicultural authors.

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Asilomar 66 Study Sessions


DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      COMMON CORE EMPHASIS      ENGLISH LEARNERS

PRESENTER
Donna Caccamise, Ph.D., whose research focuses on adolescent literacy, is an Associate Research Professor and Associate Director of the Institute of Cognitive Science at Colorado University-Boulder. (See Donna’s April article in California English, “Reading Comprehension and Stem Careers: Equity Considerations.”)

SESSION DESCRIPTION
In this session, we will interact with an evidence-based curriculum using the Construction Integration model of comprehension (a sequenced model that supports the integration between what the reader knows and what the text says). Examples will be shared to help struggling or even average readers including English learners with inadequate reading comprehension skills to learn from texts.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
A significant number of America’s youth, including our ever-growing second language populations, leave the K-12 system with inadequate reading comprehension skills that would enable them to tackle challenging college majors, subsequent careers, or even critically process information required of a good citizen. Our goal is to provide an explanation of the mental processes that underlie skilled reading. We have been working with a model of reading comprehension that is recognized as one of the more complete from the scientific community.

This session will provide examples from a curriculum designed and sequenced to help struggling or even average readers, including second language learners, develop the reading skills that enable them to learn from text and discourse. More specifically, this session will 1. Provide a detailed look at the mental operations of a good reader 2. We will discuss how we translate these principles into classroom instruction and elicit feedback and ideas from participants that focuses on equity issues in diverse populations. 3. Model and have participants engage in instructional components with continued discussion and brainstorming around feasibility and equity issues. 4. Ideas generated from 2 & 3 can inform how teachers can adapt and differentiate instruction and will be summarized as key workshop outcomes.

GRADE 3-12, COLLEGE      GENERAL ENRICHMENT TEACHING MATERIAL PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION COMMON CORE EMPHASIS ENGLISH LEARNERS

PRESENTER
Dr. Cynthia Dollins is a Senior Lecturer at Pepperdine University, Irvine. Additionally, she serves as a literacy consultant for school districts across the state. (See Cynthia’s April article in California English, “1000 Words for English Learners.”)

SESSION DESCRIPTION
All children can write creative and coherent fiction and nonfiction. As students look closely at the writing moves of real authors, they learn to emulate these same techniques. Participants will use a variety of texts (novels, journals, picture books, advertisements, recipes, etc.) as springboards for active engagement in writing activities.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Calling all writers! Whether novice or expert, let’s explore together how to teach the craft of writing to every student. The Common Core State Standards have placed a renewed emphasis on writing development. In addition to narrative, students are now asked to write increasingly sophisticated informational and explanatory texts. In order to support our students through this rigorous process, our sessions will delve into how teachers can capitalize on a variety of mentor texts to highlight and demonstrate exceptional writing. We will concentrate on close reading as a springboard to bridge children to close writing. As students become detectives of exceptional author moves, they learn to notice and then emulate these same moves in their own writing.

Participants will engage in numerous strategies to help scaffold students to writing success, focusing on author purpose, identifying a specific audience, and using appropriate writing style. We will also highlight author craft and authorial voice for both informational and narrative texts. A wide array of mentors (novels, journals, picture books, advertisements, recipes, etc.) will be examined to understand more clearly what techniques real authors use to entertain, intrigue, instruct, and enlighten readers.

As a community of writers, we will analyze the work of published authors, as well as share our own writing in an effort to appreciate, celebrate, and continue to hone our writing and teaching craft. These activities will help us grow as professionals who truly embrace lifelong learning. Write on!

GRADES 4 – 12      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS

PRESENTERS
Lauren Knuttila is a middle school reading intervention teacher with extensive experience. She is a passionate educator who seeks to inspire students with her own love of literacy. Marc Townsend is an experienced middle school history teacher who engages his students in dynamic lessons such as a reenactment of Ancient Rome in which he portrayed “Emperor Townsendicus”.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Engage in a reflective and progressive discussion on equity in the classroom through the lens of disadvantaged students. Examine topics that we, as teachers, can control–classroom climate, instructional strategies, and assessment. Revise current practices and challenge implicit biases in education. Engage in guided work time on revising a current lesson plan or assessment to be more equitable.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
“In education, the term equity refers to the principle of fairness. … It is has been said that “equity is the process; equality is the outcome. Given that equity. what is fair and just may not, in the process of educating students, reflect strict equality.” – The Glossary of Education Reform http://edglossary.org/equity/

Equitable education: one that is fair and just in allowing all students the ability to access instruction and achieve basic levels of skills, regardless of gender, ethnic origin, or family background. Attend this session to explore ways to move all students forward. We will begin by examining the systemic issues facing equitable education before narrowing in on the important areas that we, as classroom teachers, can control. We will focus on accessible instruction: such as classroom climate, instructional strategies, and assessment practices designed with disadvantaged students in mind.

Educators will participate in reflective activities through the lens of disadvantaged students before engaging in open, collaborative discussions to explore how to improve practices. The session will wrap up with guided work time on revising a current lesson plan or assessment to be more equitable. Please bring the materials you wish to examine to make this work time valuable.

GRADES 6-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTERS
Paige Wilson and Stephen Brooks are English teachers at Monte Vista High School in San Ramon Valley USD. Known for high expectations while developing students’ literary analysis skills through discussion, these teachers energize students in examining social change.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Two high school English-Language Arts teachers will discuss their use of a literature circle unit involving graphic novels to scaffold academic forms of writing and talk. We will offer teacher-ready materials and a venue for conversation about the possibilities and dilemmas of creating a dialogic space in middle school and secondary classrooms.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Graphic novels in the secondary classroom provide a unique way to leverage students’ knowledge and interests in service of learning academic literacies. To scaffold reading, speaking, and listening skills, we developed a literature circle unit with graphic novels as the primary texts. Our unit stems from several assumptions about learning. 1) Learning is a social endeavor, and opportunities for dialogic interaction around complex and challenging texts can foster high quality discussion among our students. 2) Literary learning in English classes occurs best when it capitalizes on students’ lives, interests, and experiences. 3) Students bring a wide variety of out-of-school literacies that can help scaffold in-school literacies.

We intentionally selected a diverse set of graphic novel titles that offered students controversial topics to discuss, and we provided support for students to consider multiple perspectives, challenge each other, and critically examine their assumptions. We found that students were enthusiastic about their books and looked forward to their literature circle discussions. The discussions provided a venue for their ideas about challenging issues to be taken seriously by others and interrogated. The choices offered to students and the multiple ways to demonstrate their learning promoted engagement. In online discussion boards prior to their oral discussions, students demonstrated high-level and insightful academic writing.

We were heartened to find that students from traditionally marginalized backgrounds experienced opportunities for their knowledge to be privileged in our classrooms; additionally, students from privileged groups re-evaluated their positions. Further resources including lessons, assignments, and resources used, can be found in a Google folder that we will be happy to share and distribute.

GRADES 6-12      GENERAL ENRICHMENT      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS

PRESENTERS
Paula M. L. Moya is Professor of English and director of the Research Institute of Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. She is the author of The Social Imperative: Race, Close Reading, & Contemporary Literary Criticism (Stanford University Press). Mar Yom G. Hamedani is Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Social Psychological Answers to Real-world Questions (SPARQ) at Stanford University. (See Paula and MarYam’s ’s April article in California English, “Learning to Read Race: Multicultural Literature Can Foster Racial Literacy and Empower Students.”)

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Explore how close readings that pay attention to the theme, language, and form facilitate learning. We advocate the teaching of literature that treats race as a complex and evolving category of social difference, rather than as an essential characteristic of people. This contextualized close reading of multicultural literature promotes racial literacy while empowering students.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
In this study session, we explore how contextualized close readings, paying heightened attention to the theme, language, and form of novels, stories, or poems that treat race as a complex, multivalent, and persistent social formation, can facilitate the development of racial literacy and empower students. We talk about what race is and how to use literature effectively to develop students’ racial literacy. In particular, we explore how effective close readings rely on understanding the social, historical, political, and cultural contexts from which a text emerges.

We start with the premise that race is not a thing that people have or are, but rather actions that people do. Race is a dynamic system of historically-derived and institutionalized ideas and practices. It is a way of conceptualizing, creating, reacting to, and reinforcing human difference. It is not the work of individuals alone, but the product of our globalized world. Building on this understanding of race, racial literacy involves examining the relationship between race and power, attending always to the structural, interpersonal, and individual dimensions of race. People who develop racial literacy learn how to perceive when, where, why, and how race is done; they further develop a vocabulary with which to discuss and transmit knowledge about race and antiracism.

In analyzing the doing of race, we consider its relationship to other significant social categories of difference, such as class, geography, gender, disability, sexuality, and religion. Using a variety of participatory activities, we investigate how these contextualized close reading methods can work to foster more inclusive, equitable, and empowering classrooms for low-income students and students of color.

Drawing on research and practice in education and psychology, we explore why these close-reading methods are a particularly effective pedagogical strategy for teaching literature to students from diverse racial backgrounds and developing their racial literacy skills. While we will focus on teaching strategies for middle and high school students, the learnings from this workshop will also be applicable to working with students across different age groups as well as at the college level.

Study Session Learning Goals: -Become comfortable with the project of developing racial literacy. -Become acquainted with books that promote empathy and understanding across racial difference. -Learn how to help students build schemas for novels, stories, and poems that engage diverse racial contexts. -Learn effective pedagogical strategies to engage and empower low-income students and students of color.

GRADES K-12, COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS           COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTER
Jennifer Fletcher is Professor of Humanities and Communication at California State University, Monterey Bay. She is the author of Teaching Arguments: Rhetorical Comprehension, Critique, and Response. 

SESSION DESCRIPTION
By teaching texts rhetorically, we prepare students to be adaptive thinkers and communicators who can transfer their learning to new tasks and settings. This interactive seminar explores rhetorical approaches to literature, nonfiction, and writing that empower ALL students to read and write across the diverse contexts of today and tomorrow.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
How do we prepare students for where they’re going in life? For those of us working hard to improve college access and completion, recent scholarship on transfer of learning offers important insights about how we can help students negotiate the critical transitions that increasingly determine postsecondary success—like the transition from high school to college, from school to work, and from first-year college courses into the major and beyond. Teaching for transfer promotes students’ agency and resilience by empowering them to adapt and apply their learning across diverse contexts.
This weekend-long seminar explores the idea of promoting transfer of learning as a matter of educational equity. Psychologist Robert E. Haskell defines transfer of learning as “our use of past learning when learning something new and the application of that learning to both similar and new situations” (xiii). In order for students to successfully transfer their learning from one assignment, class, discipline, or even institution to another, they must recognize–at some level–the similarities and differences between their past and present situations. Rhetorical thinking helps students to make these comparisons—to assess different communication contexts in terms of audience, purpose, occasion, and genre and to make ethical choices that are situationally responsive and appropriate. Rhetoric is the art of adaption.
Our seminar will engage in a study of shared readings on transfer and rhetoric, as well as of literary and informational texts that are rich with transfer potential, including poetry and multicultural adolescent literature. We’ll share teaching strategies and materials that can help promote transfer of learning and rhetorical thinking.
We’ll read, analyze, and discuss the following works, along with other resources that participants recommend:

Fletcher, Jennifer. “Chapter 6: Promoting Transfer of Learning.” Fostering Habits of Mind in Today’s Students: A New Approach to Developmental Education. Sterling, VA: Stylus, 2015.
Grant-Davie, Keith. “Rhetorical Situations and Their Constituents.” Rhetoric Review, vol. 15, no. 2, 1997, pp. 264–279. www.jstor.org/stable/465644.
Perkins, David N., and Gavriel Salomon. “Knowledge To Go: A Motivational And Dispositional View Of Transfer.” Educational Psychologist 47.3 (2012): 248-258. ERIC. Web. 15 Jan. 2017.

Lastly, we’ll consider ways to adapt and apply what we’ve learned over the course of the weekend to our own classrooms. Building on our discussion of key concepts and resources, we’ll explore ways to frame instruction to promote transfer of learning and rhetorical thinking. Participants are invited to bring an existing assignment, lesson plan, or activity that they’d like to revise or refine using a rhetorical approach to help students develop transferrable literacy skills.

GRADES 4-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTER
Jamie Mather is an energetic educator who teaches History and leads iPad integration at Miramonte High School in Orinda. He brings a wealth of knowledge, resources, and patience to teaching students and educators. (Stenhouse).

SESSION DESCRIPTION
We will explore ways to craft assessments using various technological platforms. The Google Drive suite and a plethora of free apps gives teachers powerful tools to deepen students’ learning and create classrooms that are fun and creative. We will develop CCSS aligned assessments/lessons to enhance learning and differentiate instruction.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
As our society becomes increasingly tech dependent (and our administrations and school boards follow suit) it is imperative that we know how to assess–and by extension, to teach – to prepare our students for this new environment. In this study session, we will explore ways to craft and deliver summative and formative assessments using various technological platforms.

The Google Drive suite and a plethora of free apps and websites gives teachers incredibly powerful tools to deepen our students’ learning and create classrooms that are simply more fun and creative–for the students and for us. This is not simply an apps presentation, where a presenter delivers a plethora of unrelated apps. We will develop CCSS aligned assessments and the lessons that accompany them to enhance learning, students’ access to the curriculum and differentiate our own practice.

GRADES K-COLLEGE      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED     DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS

PRESENTERS
Stacey Vigallon is Los Angeles Audubon’s Director of Environmental Education and a project biologist for endangered bird monitoring programs. She is keenly interested in the nexus of conservation, community-based projects, science communication, and art. A 15-year LAUSD ELA, film, and environmental stewardship teacher at Dorsey High in South LA, Robert Jeffers now supports teachers and runs professional development as Instructional Coach at an arts high school.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Direct observation of nature serves as the hub for cross-curricular connections between ELA and STEM. Using Asilomar as Nature Lab, participants will learn how to adapt the scientist’s field notebook as a tool for observation (visual, written, and personal) to promote creativity, rigorous inquiry, and invention in students’ writing practice.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Creativity is not a talent. It’s a way of operating.~ John Cleese / / Direct observation of nature can serve as the hub for numerous cross-curricular connections between the ELA, science, history, art, ethnic studies, and math. And, recent studies have underscored the positive impacts on health and well being that spending time outside confers on children. From pigeons in the parking lot to beautiful on-campus gardens, all schools provide an opportunity for students to interact with the natural world on some level.

Making use of Asilomar as Nature Lab, participants will learn strategies for leaving the physical classroom and digital screens behind to engage their students in nature-based activities that can serve as the starting point for language arts learning and more. Participants will learn how to adapt the scientist’s field notebook as a tool for observation (visual, written, and personal) to promote creativity, rigorous inquiry, and invention in students’ writing practice. Participants will learn how to take advantage of their schools’ outdoor spaces to foster interconnected and focused thinking. Through a combination of time in the field, guided instruction, discussions, and real world examples, participants will better understand how direct observation of nature can serve as a starting point for diverse curricula in the language arts, STEM, and beyond.

GRADES 9-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION      ENGLISH LEARNERS        COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTER
Harriet Garcia is a staunch supporter of social justice as an English teacher and Diversity Club advisor at Independence High School in East Side Union High School District. She is a consultant for the San Jose Area Writing Project and is a Fellow with the Yale National Initiative.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
This session centers on the structure and themes of social and political literature as an effort to guide students as learners and as vessels of social change in their families, communities, schools, and the world as a whole. Participants will be guided through various practical strategies, focusing on John Lewis’ graphic novel trilogy, March.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
This workshop specifically focuses on Congressman John Lewis’ graphic novel trilogy, March: books 1-3. The session will include the various stages that students will encounter as they maneuver through a very different format than what they are accustomed to in an academic setting.

GRADES 6-12      TEACHING MATERIAL PROVIDED      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION

PRESENTER
Dan Reynolds has advocated for human rights throughout his career as a high school English teacher and CTA representative. He developed a human rights course that is now taught throughout Mt. Diablo USD.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Explore ways you can bring human rights into your classroom. We will examine and develop approaches and lessons you can begin using immediately, to guide students to a deeper understanding of human rights, their connection to their lives, and to world events, as well as empower them to become human rights upstanders.

GRADES 6-12     USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION ENGLISH LEARNERS COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTER
Nancy Brenner, middle school librarian, brings a wealth of knowledge of adolescent literature and teaching strategies to this session.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Come and see how what you are reading in the classroom can be tied to student research and individualized projects that promote understanding and equity among students. Examples will be shared that are useful at any grade level where students are required to do research. Bring an electronic device to work on.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Participants will be introduced to several projects that have been used in the middle school classroom to expand knowledge of issues and topics covered in literature being read as a class. Projects lead to a final product that includes, but goes beyond, a written report. Projects are flexible and can be adapted to meet the skills and interests of most students. Useful at any grade level where students are being required to do research. Time will be given for putting together material to be used during the year. Participants who want to do more should bring their own electronic devices to work on.

GRADES 2-12      TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED      USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS      DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION ENGLISH LEARNERS COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTER
David Giesen teaches at the San Francisco campus of the German International School of Silicon Valley. He is also a musician known for joining his students in guitar sing alongs whie enjoying the great outdoors.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
This hands-on workshop introduces 2nd-12th grade teachers to close reading and related writing about fiction–from picture book to novel–through the lens of Woodie Guthrie’s anthem “This Land is Your Land.” In this broadly applicable session, participants will experience modeled lessons, create easy-to-replicate manipulatives, and develop and share a lesson.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
This hands-on workshop introduces 2nd-12th grade teachers to close reading and related writing about fiction–from picture book to novel–through the social lens of Woodie Guthrie’s anthem “This Land is Your Land.” The principles and materials are broadly applicable across a full school year, and with all genres: prose, poetry, and dramatic scripts. Sample reading guide sheets and literary analysis response guide sheets will be supplied. Participants will experience modeled lessons, create easy-to-replicate manipulatives demonstrating the spatial relationship dynamics of literary characters, and develop and share a sample lesson.

6-12, COLLEGE TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION ENGLISH LEARNERS

PRESENTER
Jim McCarthy teaches journalism, video production, and multimedia production in Modesto, CA. He has advised newspaper and yearbook, and now advises Gregori High’s online broadcast channel, JNN.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
The impact of digital media now shapes our perception of the world and ourselves in unprecedented ways. Educators have the responsibility to understand the media landscape and to provide students with tools for verifying information. In addition to the analytical approach to news, participants in this session will also learn by manipulating media.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Participants will identify and discuss the media landscape, the basics of media production, concepts that define truth in journalism as well as strategies for verifying the accuracy of information we receive. Participants will also learn basic compositional patterns in video messaging, techniques that shape the psychological guidance of an audience, and production curricula designed to provide teachers and students opportunities to understand media production from the creator’s perspective.

4-12, COLLEGE GENERAL ENRICHMENT TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION ENGLISH LEARNERS COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTER
Gillian Wegener is the author of The Opposite of Clairvoyance and This Sweet Haphazard, both from Sixteen Rivers Press, (2008, 2017). She is the founding president of the Modesto-Stanislaus Poetry Center and has served as poet laureate of Modesto. She is a K-12 coach for Oakdale Joint Unified School District.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Poetry in the classroom and in our lives can inspire, ensure, and sustain our students’ full potential–and our own. Join us as we explore a wide range of poets’ visions of equity–from the works of Juan Felipe Herrera to Lucille Clifton and many others. We’ll read, write, discuss, and share poetry to take back to our classrooms and our lives.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Poetry in the classroom and in our lives can inspire, ensure, and sustain our students’ full potential–and our own. Join us as we explore a wide range of poets’ visions of equity. Based on several anthologies and individual pieces by poets such as Juan Felipe Herrera, Lucille Clifton, and many others, we’ll read, write, and share some poetry to take back to our classrooms and our lives. Please join us!

9-12, COLLEGE GENERAL ENRICHMENT TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION COMMON CORE EMPHASIS

PRESENTER
An English teacher at American High School in Fremont, John Creger is the recipient of NCTE’s James Moffett Memorial Award for Teacher Research in recognition of the Personal Creed Project.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
When students learn more deeply who they are, they discover more fully who others are. This session’s participants encounter a curricular innovation that guides individual students and classroom communities to celebrate expanding understanding of self, others, and world as the missing center of CCSS-friendly learning. This growth in understanding through the Personal Creed Project is the foundation for equity.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
Information about the Personal Creed Project can be found at in the Personal Creed Group, on the English Companion Ning http://englishcompanion.ning.com/group/pers or in the Personal Creed group on Facebook.

4-12, COLLEGE TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION ENGLISH LEARNERS

PRESENTER
Bruce Badrigian was a high school teacher for many years and currently teaches at Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo. As an author, he is passionate about instilling a love for reading in every student.

SESSION DESCRIPTION

This weekend’s sessions will focus on a holistic approach to teaching reading.  Three areas to be explored will be reading fluency, communication skills, and personal interaction. Please be ready to share your ideas in these areas and other ways you motivate your students to read.
BR offers strategies that raise students’ GPAs and their reading levels. Say no to scripted parroting, AR testing, and commercial programs: Build bridges with your students, not walls.
GENERAL ENRICHMENT

PRESENTER
April Oliver is an English teacher and writer. She has been the resource person for this popular session at Asilomar for many years giving participants both the support and space to express themselves.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
Teachers of writing rarely have time to practice the craft of writing themselves. Participants select a local destination and are given time to write. Group members respond to one another’s drafts. Spend a weekend writing in the beautiful environment surrounding Asilomar and brushing up on how to get students to respond to one another’s writing.

GENERAL ENRICHMENT TEACHING MATERIALS PROVIDED USEFUL FOR NEW TEACHERS

PRESENTER
Camille Morishige is a retired educator who has led the Opera sessions at Asilomar for many years. She is active in area opera guilds and passes on her enthusiasm and expertise for opera to others.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
For many, opera has always seemed esoteric, difficult to understand, and even fearsome. We’ll fix that. Let this section both help you enjoy the emotional and intellectual rewards of opera, and learn new things. If you have ever wanted to enjoy opera, this session’s for you! You will hear new music and restore your soul.

EXPANDED DESCRIPTION
In the belief that English teachers should be particularly sensitive to all of the arts as a way of enriching their teaching of literature, we offer this section. Opera is the amalgamation of many arts, including not only operatic singing and symphonic music, but also drama, scenery, lighting, costuming and (on occasion) ballet, all of which culminates in a moving and thought provoking whole. For many, opera has always seemed esoteric, difficult to understand, and even fearsome.

This session will help both the beginner and the more knowledgeable to enjoy the emotional and intellectual rewards of operatic theater. Since operatic music is often heard in films, television, and sometimes even emerging in commercials and cartoons, the selections being presented will be familiar, enjoyable, and memorable. Materials and ideas will be provided that can be useful in classrooms, and participants will come away from the weekend humming tunes and savoring the memory.

SESSION DESCRIPTION
School or district teams can use the conference time to plan their own projects or Common Core implementation. Groups often find inspiration from the keynote and Around the Hearth sessions. Discounts offered for groups of 5 or more.

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Conference Schedule


Friday, October 6
3:30 – 9:00 Registration
4:30 – 5:30 Reception
6:00 – 7:00 Dinner
7:15 – 8:30 GENERAL SESSION A
8:45 – 9:45 GROUP SESSION #1

Saturday, October 7
7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast
8:00 – 5:45 Bookstore Open
9:00 – 10:30 GROUP SESSION #2
10:30 – 10:45 Coffee Break
10:45 – 12:00 GROUP SESSION #3
12:00 – 1:00 Lunch
1:15 – 2:30 GROUP SESSION #4
2:45 – 4:00 GENERAL SESSION B
4:00 – 5:45 Reception and Book Signing
6:00 – 7:00 Dinner
7:15 – 8:15 Around the Hearth Session I
8:30 – 9:30 Around the Hearth Session II

Sunday, October 8
7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast
8:00 – 9:00 Bookstore Open
Luggage Storage Available
9:15 – 11:15 GROUP SESSION #5

Recent Conferences

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